Open Peer Discussion Forum for Economic Thought

This site presents papers that scholars have submitted for publication in Economic Thought. You are cordially invited to comment on these papers.

Comments can range from short remarks to full reviews.  We encourage you to be frank, but polite. As a rule, commentators should give their name. If they fear hurting their relationship with authors, they can use an alias, which has to be clearly recognizable as such.

Editors will vet comments before publication to make sure appropriate and comprehensible language is used and that they are  directly on the paper at hand. Since the OPD plays a crucial role in the peer review process, commentators are requested to make substantive comments relating to the content of the articles that they are engaging with. Comments that either fail to engage with the material, or express an opinion (positive or negative) about the article without making a substantive contribution will not be accepted. Standards of fairness will be particularly high if an alias is used

Authors who have submitted a paper for open peer review are strongly encouraged to take part in this collaborative effort by responding to comments and by reading and commenting on papers of other authors. Where a paper is selected for publication in the journal and there is a comment on the OPD which takes the form of an extended commentary and is of sufficient quality, the editors may, at their discretion, decide to publish this commentary alongside the paper.

We thank all contributors very much for their time and input.

Papers under review

Ricardo’s numerical example versus Ricardian trade model: A comparison of two distinct notions of comparative advantage

The so-called Ricardian trade model of contemporary economic textbooks is not a rational reconstruction of Ricardo’s famous numerical example in chapter seven of the Principles. It differs from the latter in terms of definition of the four numbers, relevant cost …

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Posted for review 5 Jul 2016

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Keynes, the National Industrial Recovery Act and the Demise of Nascent Real Business Cycle Analysis

The National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) of 1933 called for a radical reorganization of U.S. industry, substantial wage increases, workers’ right to bargain collectively as well as unprecedented government works projects. In a letter to President Roosevelt, British economist John …

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Posted for review 29 Apr 2016

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